A Mother’s Holiday Wish

December 17, 2013

As 2013 winds down, my heart is full of appreciation for the remarkable progress we’ve made at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats. I won’t outline the strides that have been made in building a home for adults with autism that will also create jobs for them that fit their skills, interests and abilities. Instead, this blog is a mother’s holiday wish for adults with autism.

My son Erik was diagnosed with autism at age 2. At that time, two in 10,000 children were being diagnosed with autism. Today, as Erik has cleared his 22nd birthday, one in 50 are diagnosed with it. That’s a huge increase, but it also portends a grim future for those children once they reach adulthood. I realized when Erik was young that this problem was not being addressed, and I needed to address it. The idea of Erik’s Ranch & Retreats began to form because I didn’t want Erik to be without options.

As a mother, I know my son would be angry and depressed if he were relegated to a life of menial tasks. I couldn’t bear that. So, I’ve been working since 2008 to create a place for adults with autism where they can use their abilities to work in a safe and supported environment that is also their home. But I want this possibility for more than just my son.

In my dreams, I envision an environment for adults with autism that offers them the opportunity to develop their skills and translate them into meaningful jobs. These adults would be at home with peers and guests who come to stay at our ranch in Montana and retreat in Minnesota. Adults with autism and guests will get to know each other, fostering integration of community members into the lives of adults with autism and vice versa. As the lines of friendship form, the lines of what we perceive as normal become blurred, and a new definition of normal can rightly appear.

Do you think my wish is a pipedream? I don’t. To paraphrase Walt Disney, “If I can dream it, I can achieve it.” I invite everyone to participate in this dream.

As Erik’s mother and CEO of Erik’s Ranch & Retreats, my wish for everyone this holiday season is that if you have big dreams, you set out to achieve them.images

Happy holidays from all of us at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats

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Connections among people are vital to physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. Anyone who took psychology 101 will probably remember Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. It goes something like this: fundamental among needs humans require is connection—esteem, friendship and love. If these are not met, individuals feel anxious and tense.

Also, as anyone who has been affected by autism will attest, connection is often more difficult because of the disorder or misperceptions about autism

I’ve started this blog mentioning Maslow and the human needs because I watched, and was charmed by, a spectacle that took place Friday night at the Erik’s Ranch & Retreats’ Diamonds in the Rough. Although it ostensibly was a fundraiser and awareness raiser for adults with autism, I watched connections being made among people who would not ordinarily have come together.

Under the aegis of an art exhibit and sale, our Erik’s Minnesota Adventures tour guides convened at Griffin Gallery in Edina, Minnesota, to mingle with artists and guests. I watched each of the young adults with autism easily converse with guests. I think back to a year ago, when Erik’s Minnesota Adventures had just started. These same social butterflies were not nearly as confident, nor would they have mingled as easily as they did this year.

I’m not saying that Erik’s Minnesota Adventures is the only reason they have self-confidence, but it has helped them find their voices. The connections each one made warms my heart and tells me that changing perception is tantamount to what we do at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats.

As fundraisers go, I would have liked to sell more art. On a connection basis, however, I believe that it was a huge success. My thanks to everyone who joined us, helped and made this evening a success.

Mary Nelson, communications director, Erik’s Ranch & Retreats

 

As communications director for Erik’s Ranch & Retreats, I sometimes like to offer up my views, ideas and thoughts about autism and the adults we serve. Today, I want to discuss advocacy and our upcoming Diamonds in the Rough, which is our inaugural art exhibit and sale.

On the surface, this event may appear to be a fundraiser. Although raising funds is part of the picture, it’s more. Many individuals with autism are talented artists who need an advocate to help them exhibit their work. As any artist knows, art is a tough business and assistance is often a matter of survival. Diamonds in the Rough can be your advocate. The event will include art from individuals on the spectrum, as well as established artists. The established artists may be what draws people in; but once collectors enter the gallery, they could easily discover an unknown artist: YOU.

This is an opportunity to do several things: 1) show your art to collectors, 2) hang your art in a prestigious gallery, 3) receive compensation for your art (artists on the spectrum receive 50 percent of the sale of their art) and 4) possibly be discovered.

There’s still time to submit, just visit our website and look at the Diamonds in the Rough submission guidelines or send an email to art@eriksranch.org and we’ll help you submit art for this event. But don’t wait; the submission deadline is July 30. Contact us today and let the world see what we already know: you have talent.

Traditionally, June is a time for graduation. A time for endings, and a time for beginnings. Young adults leaving high school look to the future with a mixture of eagerness and apprehension. This is true for any high school graduate, but particularly for graduates who live with autism. I ran across this blog on the Autism Speaks website. It offers suggestions, assistance and tips to assist parents of youth with autism to help their children make the transition.

As the blog notes, over the next 10 years, more than a half million children with autism will enter adulthood.

I know I’ve said this before, and maybe I’m preaching to the choir, but NOW is the time to act. To be fair, there are pockets of groups and individuals who understand this. I’ve recently learned of the Madison House Autism Foundation, whose goal is to develop a national conversation around and strategic solutions to the lifespan challenges faced by adults with autism and their families. There are others, but it needs to be a universal cause.

Despite the years of working to advocate for our own children, it’s become even more urgent to advocate for all children and adults on the autism spectrum. Yes, groups are doing that, and I’d love to tell you all the work is done and we can just reap the benefits of that work. However, that’s not the case.

At Erik’s Ranch & Retreats, we have found that with a dawning awareness of the need for continued supports, there’s even more work to do. As advocates for adults with autism, staff at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats look daily for new ways to help society understand that adults with autism have unique and special talents that they need to be able to express. Our tour program, Erik’s Minnesota Adventures is one example of taking the interests and expertise of an adult with autism and turning it into a job that serves that individual and the community at large.

Recently we launched Genuine Genius, videos of individuals with autism doing what they love. We’re soliciting and posting 60-second videos from people around the world to help show the world what we already know; those with autism have talents to share. Follow me on Twitter as I tweet the videos to my followers @KathrynNordberg or visit http://www.mygenuinegenuis.org, watch the videos and then share one of your own. Help society recognize the gifts individuals with autism have.

We, also, are preparing our inaugural Diamonds in the Rough, an art exhibit and sale to benefit adults with autism and Erik’s Ranch & Retreats. This October event will feature art from individuals with autism as well as emerging and established local, national and international artists. Artists with autism will receive compensation for submitting their art and becomes another way for these individuals to demonstrate their value to society and gain compensation for their talents.

I know everyone is busy, but take a moment to visit these sites and see how you can help spread awareness that individuals with autism are skilled and talented and deserve the same opportunities as their peers. This is, after all, a cause that will serve everyone, not just individuals with autism.