A Mother’s Holiday Wish

December 17, 2013

As 2013 winds down, my heart is full of appreciation for the remarkable progress we’ve made at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats. I won’t outline the strides that have been made in building a home for adults with autism that will also create jobs for them that fit their skills, interests and abilities. Instead, this blog is a mother’s holiday wish for adults with autism.

My son Erik was diagnosed with autism at age 2. At that time, two in 10,000 children were being diagnosed with autism. Today, as Erik has cleared his 22nd birthday, one in 50 are diagnosed with it. That’s a huge increase, but it also portends a grim future for those children once they reach adulthood. I realized when Erik was young that this problem was not being addressed, and I needed to address it. The idea of Erik’s Ranch & Retreats began to form because I didn’t want Erik to be without options.

As a mother, I know my son would be angry and depressed if he were relegated to a life of menial tasks. I couldn’t bear that. So, I’ve been working since 2008 to create a place for adults with autism where they can use their abilities to work in a safe and supported environment that is also their home. But I want this possibility for more than just my son.

In my dreams, I envision an environment for adults with autism that offers them the opportunity to develop their skills and translate them into meaningful jobs. These adults would be at home with peers and guests who come to stay at our ranch in Montana and retreat in Minnesota. Adults with autism and guests will get to know each other, fostering integration of community members into the lives of adults with autism and vice versa. As the lines of friendship form, the lines of what we perceive as normal become blurred, and a new definition of normal can rightly appear.

Do you think my wish is a pipedream? I don’t. To paraphrase Walt Disney, “If I can dream it, I can achieve it.” I invite everyone to participate in this dream.

As Erik’s mother and CEO of Erik’s Ranch & Retreats, my wish for everyone this holiday season is that if you have big dreams, you set out to achieve them.images

Happy holidays from all of us at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats

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It’s no secret that once children with autism graduate from high school—50,000-plus individuals annually—they are less likely than their peers to find jobs. But more troubling is that peers with other disabilities—low IQs, learning disabilities and difficulty speaking and communicating—fare much better. Not only do they more often find jobs, they receive more pay, according to studies cited in a Health Day article.

Another study featured in the same article goes hand-in-hand with jobs. When it comes to living arrangements, “researchers found that only 17 percent of young adults with autism, who were between 21 and 25 years old, had ever lived on their own.” It does stand to reason, however, that without a job, adults with autism are without the financial means to live on their own.

The saddest thing about the results of these studies is that these situations do not need to prevail. The problem, in part, is that there are not enough programs available to help these young adults channel their many skills into acquiring meaningful jobs. But the good news is that some companies and parents are taking matters into their own hands. I’ve mentioned Specialisterne before in this blog. It’s the Danish IT company that only hires individuals with autism. An article in the San Jose Mercury News revealed that Semperical in San Jose, also, will exclusively train and employ individuals with autism as software testers.

But, again, we’re looking at jobs in information technology. Adults with autism have diverse skills. That’s where parents have stepped up. As the link to this article shows, parents realized they needed to create jobs for their children with autism. They are finding ways to help their children break away from the dismal results of these studies. The parents are creating jobs that play to their children’s strengths. These are the grass roots efforts that will make the difference.

Much the same as the parents in the article above, I have lamented that young adults with autism are passed over for jobs they are infinitely skilled to do because of communication and social difficulties. Like these parents, I was frustrated and decided to take the situation into my own hands. That was when I created Erik’s Ranch & Retreats and subsequently Erik’s Minnesota Adventures. But, I’m only one person and I don’t have all the answers. So many young people need our help, and in a concerted effort we can raise our voices and lend our efforts to accommodating the skills and abilities of these young adults. The learning curve for changing the way society views individuals with autism, the perspective of what is normal and how businesses incorporate workers with different abilities is a huge undertaking, but it’s a change that must be made.

It takes groups of like-minded and interested individuals to collaborate, plan and educate the entire country, while cottage industries may be the interim solution for adults with autism to find opportunities to lead lives of purpose and possibility. How to make the change is a conversation that must occur among all of us.