Seeing the Whole Person: Drop the Autism Blinders

July 17, 2013

I want to introduce you to Stephen Shore, PhD, speaker, author and consultant whose expertise is working with people with autism.  Shore will speak at the Autism Speaks National Conference for Families and Professionals July 26.

Shore, diagnosed with autism at a young age and nonverbal until age 4, beat a lot of odds because his parents didn’t agree with the doctors that the only option was to institutionalize their child. Today, he is a professor at Adelphia University where his research focuses on matching best-practices to the needs of people with autism.

Shore will discuss his perspective on working with people with autism, and I was particularly drawn to this comment, largely because it is the foundation for Erik’s Ranch & Retreats.

He said, “Autism is a study of extremes, and if we can focus on the strengths and interests of individuals rather than weaknesses, a good employment fit is possible. All of us are more successful when working in an area related to our interests and this is especially true for people on the spectrum.”

Now, I’d like to introduce you to TJ, one of Erik’s Minnesota Adventures tour guides. For those who don’t know, we help adults with autism develop tours based on their skills, interests and expertise. The tours are complimentary, and we’ve been in business for more than a year. Our tour guides have led more than 160 tours with more than 630 volunteer guests. Guests couldn’t be more pleased with the entertaining and educational tours led by these remarkable individuals. TJ is a tour guide whose interests are varied, but we managed to narrow his tours down to art and architecture. For now.

His architecture tour includes the historic James J. Hill House in Minneapolis where he works alongside employees there to present its architectural background and history. So impressive is his knowledge of the history, architecture and background that he was offered the opportunity to apply for a job as a tour guide at the James J. Hill House. Needless to say, TJ was thrilled.

You know, we all shine when the light is cast on our abilities, and that’s the premise behind our program. Helping TJ develop tours that shine a light on his brilliance gave him an opportunity he wouldn’t have otherwise had. We all can excel when we are seen as a whole person. Seeing only autism is so limiting. So, I like to think we’re giving our tour guests the opportunity to see our guides as whole people. The rest comes naturally.

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