I watched an interesting video the other day. A young woman named Faith Jegede talked about what she has learned from her brothers who both have autism. This arresting comment she made toward the end of the video made me want to stand up and cheer.

“The pursuit of normality is the ultimate sacrifice of potential,” she said. “So, please don’t call me normal.”

I applaud Faith’s perspective and admission that, yes, there have been trials when it comes to her brothers, but they recede in light of what her brothers have taught her about life and living.

I know that we have just gone through Autism Awareness month. But, I think there’s more to do than just making people aware that autism exists and that it has become an epidemic.

Society would be better served by looking past the differences of individuals with autism. Expanding our idea of what is normal bears consideration. They are who they are, as we are who we are. I want to be accepted for who I am. I should not expect that to be any different for someone who has autism.

Let me tell this story to help illustrate what I mean. A young adult with autism was asked to participate in an internship at a large company. The work he was assigned was menial and mostly repetitive; certainly not a job that would challenge anyone. One day a piece of equipment came in that needed repair. None of the professionals could figure out what was wrong, and therefore, couldn’t fix it. While they went on break, however, the intern diagnosed the problem and repaired the equipment, saving the company thousands of dollars. But, rather than recognize his abilities and promote him to more suitable work, he was merely thanked and sent back to his menial tasks.

When the myopic pursuit of normal is expanded, potential will no longer be sacrificed.

If you’re in the mood for some deep reading, I have just the thing. As director of communications for Erik’s Ranch & Retreats, I follow news about autism fairly closely. Several weeks ago, in this blog, we focused on the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM-V, with the most recent changes, one regarding removing a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome. This change generated a lot of public concern. Then, just the other day, I found this article in the New York Times. It cited Dr. Thomas R. Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). He said the DSM-V suffers from a scientific lack of validity.

He wasn’t advocating ignoring the DSM-V altogether, because it is what we have. However, he indicated that science needs to go beyond diagnosing symptoms and focus on biology, genetics and neurosciences to get to the cause. As a result, Dr. Insel announced on April 29 that the NIMH has launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project “to transform diagnosis by incorporating genetics, imaging, cognitive science and other levels of information to lay the foundation for a new classification system,” and subsequently, more effective treatment. The RDoC is not a quick fix. It will take time to change the way research and diagnosis are conducted. But, it was heartening to learn that emerging data will be used instead of relying on static categories. It will also be interesting to watch and see the outcome of this endeavor.

Shortly after reading Dr. Insell’s announcement, I ran across this article in the New Yorker outlining how the RDoC will change the way diagnosis and subsequent treatment will be reoriented. I gleaned that the NIMH has implemented the RDoC project to continue to move research forward as well as the keep in mind the treatment of unique individuals, and I was encouraged. Which brings me to this story about Kevin, whose doctor already treats people, not just symptoms.

My whole point here is to reiterate that individuals with autism are unique and should not be defined by a diagnosis. When you look closely, you will find that extraordinary potential is not being tapped, and that’s a shame. Looking beyond a category and seeing a person will help foment change in perspective and treatment. That’s why the at Erik’s Ranch & Retreats has been not only to serve those on the spectrum, but to advocate on their behalf.